3.7.11 ENERGY@Home

See this evidence for context

Energy at home - dashboard

Energy at home - dashboard


Background
Exploiting the similarities to the infamous distributed computing project “SETI@Home”, where thousands of private computers all over the world are pooled to make a joint effort to analyse radio signals from space[1], I suggest the services of “ENERGY@Home”. It is a service that pools thousands of micro generators all over the world. This creates a virtual utility, comparable to a file sharing network where electricity is distributed and statistics of production are dissected.

Motivation
Using this product is a matter of participating in a community that pools its resources (electricity) to the benefit of its participants. Sharing production statistics as well as sharing the energy (not evidenced at this point) is a step in the road to become self-sufficient on electricity.

Process
This service is evidenced as a widget, a small standalone application, that can be included in any web page. In this case the widget is added by the blog owner Eric André (my main persona), and it is accessible through the blog sidebar. The widget, when clicked, takes you to the main energy@home web site (see above) that I included to suggest how this service might be presented. Its intention is to let you have details on your own statistics, your community statistics and global statistics.

Myenergyusage community statistics, in real time!

Myenergyusage community statistics, in real time!

Reference Project
Aside from the SETI@home project mentioned above, the idea is related to the consumption data sharing community myenergyusage.org. This community shares data from the Wattson energy meter and pools them to see the total consumption by the community. Energy at home takes this to the next step by sharing production data on a personal, local (community) and global level. And through the site the intention is that they will trade or share the energy between them. (The gauges are the same as they are provided by a google API)

References in this post
  1. Anderson, D., Cobb, J., Korpela, E., Lebofsky, M., & Werthimer,
    D. (2002). SETI@home: An Experiment in Public-Resource Computing. Berkley: Space Sciences Laboratory U.C. Berkley. [*]

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